Creating Word Art

word-art

Writers are artist just like painters. We create a picture with our words much like the painter does with a stroke of the brush.

When you choose to create ask yourself a couple of questions.

  1. Do you care about what you are writing? If you don’t, why would a reader?
  2. Are you bored with the topic? Your reader will be too.
  3. Are you giving quality information? Or are you just filling up space on the paper?

If these questions give you pause, maybe you need to start fresh. Find that topic, or way to tell the story, that paints a vivid picture.

If you’ve got the perfect story to tell, make sure you have a full set of brushes and a vivid pallet of colors on hand.

Hook your reader up front with a lead that grabs their attention. Make it something that sparks their curiosity. Leads ideally are 30-35 words and only 1-2 sentences.  Leads can take many forms. Some will set the scene while others ask questions. Whichever you chose make those words draw your readers in for more.

Creativity grows when you feed it. Make it a point to read others who inspire you. Great writers are readers.

Let your words appeal to the senses. Show your readers how something smells, looks or tastes. Details matter, especially when you are describing people. Build your scene like an artist layers a painting.

Take chances. It’s ok to try a new approach. Rework a piece. Tell the story from an unexpected perspective.

You can’t create a masterpiece when you are distracted. Guard your writing time and space. It’s ok to tell people you are writing and don’t need to be disturbed. If the dreaded writers block rears its ugly head (and it will at some point) don’t let it discourage you. Try starting in the middle of the story. If that doesn’t work, get up and walk around. You’d be surprised at how a change of scenery can open up your mind.

Finally, before you’re ready to hang your masterpiece out there for everyone to see, make sure you have someone else review it. You can’t edit your own work. You know what you were trying to say. We all get to invested in “our words.”

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